SHAC Awards 2013

  

Bella Bloomfield is the winner of the 2013 SHAC Competition held with Surf Life Saving New Zealand.

PortaBell-Tower-SHAC2013-Winner

We saw a number of excellent entries from students and professionals from all over New Zealand for the SHAC 2013 Surf Life Saving Tower Challenge.

Bella’s tower, the Portabella, most impressed the participating Surf Life Saving New Zealand clubs, their members, and SHAC judges.  She also won the Otago Polytechnic Design Prototype Award and $800 in their 2013 grad show for this work.

Bella’s Surf Life Saving tower design and prototype is now available for purchase from BB Cocoon Design

Furthermore, SHAC is pleased to announce that Mark Mismash has been awarded the “SHAC Research Leader Award for 2013″ for his innovative interventions in Christchurch communities.

Contacts:
SHAC | Tim Bishop | 021 750 346
Surf Life Saving New Zealand | Nick Mulcahy | 04 560 0334
Cocoon Design | Bella Bloomfield | [email protected]
Otago Polytechnic | 0800 762 786

Sustainable Habitat Challenge 2013 – Call for Entries

  
Richard Horden "Beach Point" 1997

Richard Horden “Beach Point” 1997

Design a subconsent Surf Lifesaving Tower.

Two or more A3 sheets due 30 Aug 2013 12:00 noon.

Background

How are we going to live well, with purpose, with more community, and with less reliance on resources like materials and energy?

The SHAC Challenge is a way to learn about the building code, experiment with buildings, and to develop prototypes for our new built environment. We designers, engineers, architects, builders, and others will be creating our new built environment for the rest of our lives.

This challenge has entrants considering a a key future design need: structures that sit off of the ground, on potentially adjustable supports.  How is the structure anchored to the ground?  Are the anchors durable? When will the structure overturn?

Objectives
* Provide a playful competition to help designers, builders and the public better understand the art and science of building.
* Promote design and build as a collaborative, evolutionary process
* Promote the re-use of building materials
* Promote living well, with purpose, and with less reliance on money and resources
* Promote creative responses that do not require a large budget

Design Requirements
* The building must not require building consent, as per the DBH discussion document.  Example exemptions (daawalls fences), (gadecks), (i10m2 buildings), (jveranda/patio/porch/awnings), (jb – pergola), (je – shade sail), (jf – carport), and (k – low cost / consequence).  Exemptions can be combined.
* The building will provide for use as a surf life saving tower. It may also provide other use(s) now or in the future.
* The building may make use of recycled building materials.
* The building may make use of solar energy: eg, passive solar, solar electric, or solar thermal technology.

Entry Requirements and Checklist

* Register for your number here
* Please email your submission to [email protected].
* Due Date – 30 Aug 2013 12:00 noon [NZ time] * 150 word description of the project in the body of the email [same as described below] * ProjectName-SubmissionNumber-A3.pdf
* ProjectName-SubmissionNumber-image.png   [or .jpg or .gif] * ProjectName-SubmissionNumber-any other file   [could be sketchup, pdf of photos, etc] * The PDF A3 presentation sheets are what explain the project. This may include sketches, plans, elevations, sections, and/or photos of the materials or techniques to be used.
* Entries not to include your names or logos, only your assigned submission number.
* In 150 words or less explain the following:
a) The project and its purpose, it’s present and potential future uses.
b) Possible methods of construction
c) List the exemptions used from Schedule 1 of the building Act.
d) How the project will be supplied with any electrical power, and water, if needed.
* You may choose to include a sketchup file. Or photos of projects underway are acceptable.
* Please submit all files electronically to [email protected].
* Maximum size about 20MB per email.
* Submitted designs should be copyrighted under a Creative Commons license of your choice, suggested: “CC-Attribution” or “CC-Attribution-NonCommercial”
* Judging will take place in September-November.
* Best entries will be honoured with awards and prizes
* Submitted designs should be copyrighted by the author(s) under a Creative Commons license of your choice, suggested: “CC-Attribution” or “CC-Attribution-NonCommercial”* Questions can be sent to [email protected], and answers will be sent to all registered teams.
* SHAC reserves the right to not accept any entries.
* Best entries will be honoured with awards and prizes.
* All entries may be published by SHAC on our web site or other medium.
* Thank you for your submission!

8eccbbe79bfb202f35afbb465356ba2a

 

The Chair - Wilson and Hill Architects

The Chair – Wilson and Hill Architects

More on Surf Life Saving Towers from Surf Life Saving New Zealand >>> (PDF)

Help us advertise – please put up a poster for us:  A3-PDF, A4-PDF

2012 Entries >>>

Surf Life Saving Towers

  

There are a range of surf lifeguard patrol towers currently in use throughout New Zealand, including:

· Patrol towers incorporated within clubhouse’s (e.g. Titahi Bay); these are typically rooms which protrude from the clubhouse. They are common where the clubhouse has been built on the active beach or foredune.

· Standalone fixed structures (e.g. Muriwai Beach); these are solid structures, which are often built into the foredune. They have typically been used where the clubhouse is situated a considerable distance back from the beach (as such have limited view of the beach).

· Semi-mobile structures (e.g. Takapuna Beach); these structures are placed on the beach, and are self-supporting. They have typically been used where there is a surf lifeguarding service, but no club or clubhouse. These towers are removed from the beach (via crane) and stored during the off-season.

· Mobile structures (e.g. Piha Beach); these are driven on/off the beach daily.

The key functional requirements and intended benefits differ with each type of patrol tower. The particular tower a club/surf lifeguard service choose will depend on the need of the service and the funding available.

There are a range of different designs for each type of patrol tower, with many different examples throughout New Zealand. Surf Life Saving clubs have traditionally engaged a designer and/or manufacturer to produce their tower based on their needs and requirements.

Intensive Urban Agriculture

  

I seem to get confused often by the word garden. I always think vegetables, but sometimes I later realise that people mean decorative gardens! When I was in Japan last month I specifically went to Kyoto because I heard it was called a garden city.

The Japanese were very hungry at the end of the second world war. Vast areas of the urban landscape had been destroyed. In the first 7 postwar years, three large earthquakes also contributed to the difficulties.

Intensive gardening and farming fills the suburban neighbourhoods of Kyoto. Groups of two and three story houses with private decorative gardens are surrounded by paddocks of vegetables and rice.

For a peppercorn rent, residents let a few furrows for their own use, or larger areas to sell to local shops.

The lack of fencing allows for small tractors and other machinery to be used and shared by many.

Kyoto is known for the garden city – for its decorative gardens – but I like the productive vegetable gardens.

Earth Systems

  

Japan is fascinating. The Japanese are so respectful of everything -work, other people, the natural world. And they have so many rituals – for me it seems to be a way to relax. Together it makes for a human society that is synchronized with the natural environment. Their technology is very efficient and they husband their natural environment so as it produces so many useful things from urban land, rural land, and even the forests. Japan is about 130% the size of New Zealand. And they are worried that they only produce food for about 40% of their population. That is 48 million people!

Kyoto

In early February I visited Tokyo and Kyoto. Tokyo is the megalopolis – it has huge apartment buildings that extend as far as I could see from the 18th floor of my hostel. Kyoto on the other hand is largely 2 and 3 story buildings interspersed with many decorative gardens, temples, and productive fields.

I presented at the “Earth Systems Governance Conference Tokyo 2013” at the United Nations University. Yes I fell off my chair when I was accepted to speak at this conference!!

The conference is trying to raise the point that all of humanity is a system “governed” by written and unwritten, or formal and informal, rules and norms.

The conference did attract many presenters on top-down international relations and nuclear energy policy, however the project is also about “bottom up”, grassroots changes in our human-made earth system.

It was a fascinating conference – I was astonished that the people that consider big global issues find what we are doing in Christchurch interesting.

Presently, in New Zealand, the current set of unwritten rules and norms say: “houses are very expensive; spending 5 times your annual income on your house is the best way to save for the future; building a house is best left to the experts; group action is ineffective; excellence and high performance is the sole realm of the highly trained professional; making positive change in your life is profoundly difficult and best left to the experts.”

I presented on the emerging network of groups in Christchurch that are showing other possibilities and suggesting new norms.  These groups are creating new possibilities and presenting new ideas that will likely lead to a more sustainable built environment.

One key idea is that we use volunteers and skilled people collaborating together. Another is that you don’t need to be a highly trained person to start something.

There is an informal network of groups in Christchurch that have responded to the earthquake are rewriting the informal rules, and creating new norms. These groups include Greening the Rubble – [gardens can be anywhere!], Gapfiller – [life is a stage!], CPIT – [we are learning by doing!], Live in Vacant Spaces [there are other ways to access land!], The Concert [volunteers are effective, and it is very fun!], Rekindle [we don’t have to throw those building materials away!], White Elephant [young people create and do!], Renew Brighton [a community can remake itself] Maybe one day the formal rules could change, in response.

Written rules also have an impact that was recently documented by Stu Donovan on transportblog.co.nz

The primary impact of local government regulations is not through the constraints they place on land supply (i.e. urban containment), but actually through the barriers they create to the development of more compact and affordable housing. Here’s some examples of regulations pursued by local governments in New Zealand that seem likely to restrict the supply of affordable housing:

  1. Minimum lot sizes – i.e. “all ye who have less money shall be forced to purchase land you don’t want.
  2. Minimum apartment sizes – i.e. “all ye who have less money shall be forced to purchase living space you don’t want.
  3. Minimum parking requirements – i.e. “all ye who have less money shall be forced to pay for vehicles you don’t own”.
  4. Maximum height limits – i.e. “all ye who chose to live like rats are consigned to perish like rats – on the street.
  5. Heritage protections – i.e. “all ye who don’t have the money to renovate a villa shall live elsewhere.

The Earth Systems Science Plan defines the five analytical problems of governance. The five A’s, for short: Agency – to what degree groups and individuals feel like they can act to create positive change. Allocation and Access – how individuals and groups are allocated or access needed resources like land, housing, food. Accountability – projects are legitimated – how do we know about, participate in the decision making around projects that affect or interest us? Adaptiveness – how do we change or reorganize in response to needs? And finally, Architecture – what structure of organization allows for good outcomes in the other areas? For example, what type of command and control, what processes or procedures, or what norms?

In Christchurch we have a loose network of groups that come together for various projects as suits each group. Each group thus retains its own agency – the ability to act. There are no formal contracts between groups that restrict or prohibit action.  Each group has a few energetic coordinators who harness the capacity of skilled professionals and keen volunteers/apprentices. No explicit coordination between groups is needed. Each group’s actions are coordinated by skilled and resourceful coordinators who keep the momentum going.

Projects are “legitimated” when people volunteer to do them. Good projects are supported by volunteers. Employees do what their bosses say, but volunteers only work on things they believe in.  More volunteers equals more legitimacy equals more impact. It is unlikely that an unpopular project will have a big impact, while popular projects will grow and grow.

And It seems that from this architecture of a loose affiliation of interacting groups, supported by a mix of volunteers and professionals, emerges a system that can support a more sustainable built environment.  In other words it supports supports multiple groups to have agency, to have legitimacy, and to demonstrate other ways of allocation and access to resources.

Will this hodge-podge of groups lead to a more sustainable built environment? This is still to be discovered. I had an intuition that this was the case, and the conference introduced me to the academic literature further supports this case:  That small, self-governing systems of local groups do effectively and fairly allocate limited resources. See, for example, the work of natural resource economist Elinor Ostrom.

We are prototyping possibilities for the future today!

SHAC Micro-Challenge – “Sustainable” office chair

  

A Sustainable Office Chair? $200 cash prize!

David McKay makes a convincing argument that 40% of our total energy use goes to make the products that we buy.

Announcing a SHAC Micro-Challenge – The “Sustainable Office Chair”

Please submit your sketch or photo of your practical and comfortable Sustainable Office Chair.

Is it one made from natural materials, or a durable and repairable chair that lasts for many years, or one made from entirely recycled products, or hand made, or made by a machine like a 3D printer, or a chair that is made from starch and dissolves when wet?

Judging: Chair must be practical, comfortable, suitable for your office, and “sustainable”

Please supply a photo or sketch and a short description, how to make the chair, and how is the chair “sustainable” – that is – supporting living well, with purpose, and with less reliance on resources.

Please email your submissions to tim@sha[email protected] by the 24 October 2012.  $200 cash prize for the best submission.  Other prizes too! The judges decision is final.  The best submissions will be exhibited publically.

SHAC Chair Challenge Poster [PDF]

Living large with 10m2 buildings

  

Two 10 square metre buildings built rather close together.  Eaves and awnings nearly connect the two buildings.

SHAC 10 sq metre Challenge Judging Criteria

  

How are we going to live well, with purpose, and with less reliance on resources like materials and energy?

The SHAC Challenge is a way to learn about the building code, experiment with buildings, and to develop prototypes for our new built environment.  We designers, engineers, architects, builders, and others will be creating our new built environment for the rest of our lives.  Lets have fun with this:  Enter the SHAC 10m2 Challenge! – due 20 August 2012.  [entry details...]

For example, energy is an important resource, and in New Zealand we presently use about 40% of our total personal energy for transport, 20% in the home and to produce our food, and 40% to produce the stuff we buy ( Scadden, p12 ). [Burning coal and oil in far-away, overseas factories].

Our new built environment will reduce our need for resources like water and energy by a number of methods.  Our judges will consider entries according to these points, from technical improvements to projects that inspire creativity and support people so that they have understanding, energy, and the will to create.  SHAC judges will take a wholistic approach in judging.

Judging Criteria

1) responding to a need

2) improving our knowledge, technical ability, and desire for durable, repairable stuff [from housing to cell phones], so that over time we have much less need to buy so much of it.  Teaching young people how to design, build, and maintain buildings and things is a great start!

3) stimulating and developing knowledge, awareness, and use of small quantities of valuable renewable electricty.

4) reducing the need for, and facilitating alternatives to private automotive travel

5) reducing the need for, and facilitating alternatives to regular business travel

6) Facilitating groups of people to get together to share ideas and create.

7) Stimulating the imagination and supporting groups of people to make progress on creating  an environmentally sound and socially just society.

8) Exhibiting a quality and care of construction that inspires others to support, promote  similar projects, and adapt and reuse your designs in future work.

F3 SiloStay

  

SHAC Awards 2012

  

May 2012 Awards
Rebuild and Reuse – for the Whole House Reuse project Juliet Arnott –
Design – F3 Design
Community Development  –   Joshua Durrant, Jess Smale, Sophie Moore
Micro and Temporary Architecture – Gapfiller
Commercialisation –  Danny Squires and Martin Luff  ThinkRadical.Net

On the 2-3 May 2012, SHAC presented the 2nd annual workshop on micro-architecture at the Christchurch Polytechnic Student Centre.  Sixty attendees discussed temporary architecture, simple buildings, and the reuse of building material.

“People cherish their culture through recycling” – those are the words of Wang Shu, the 2012 winner of the Pritzker architecture prize.  The demolition of red stickered housing and CBD buildings does not have to mean the eradication of Christchurch’s history or culture – nearly all materials can be reused in new construction, incorporating local memories and fusing the past with the present.

What is permanent in this land of earthquakes? In San Francisco, the Palace of Fine Arts was built in 1915 as a temporary building for the Panama-Pacific Exposition and still stands today as an icon of the city.  From the cardboard cathedral to the convention centre – how long will they serve us?

“Simple buildings are key for affordability” said Canadian architect Brian McKay Lyons, recently interviewed on Nine to Noon with Kim Hill.  Lyons, from Nova Scotia, says “simple buildings are what we farmers and fishermen build when we can’t afford to get things wrong”

SHAC Micro-Architecture Workshop 2-3 May 2012

Micro-Architecture Workshop 2012

  
2-3 May 2012, CPSA Building, CPIT, Christchurch.
Micro and Temporary Architecture, Simple Building, and Reuse of Materials 

Ticket Type




on how spending time on the small details helps the big picture emerge from the efforts of many.
We’d like your attendance, and contribution.  Builders, developers, architects, designers, and more.
INSPIRATION
  1. Kevin Low’s Small Projects
  2. Chris and Ben’s SPACE MoveableRooms
  3. GapFiller’s Tati Design Competition and Temporary 10m2 Office
  4. DesignBoom’s Small Houses
  5. Dwelle
  6. More Overseas and NZ examples at micro-architecture.shac.org.nz

SHAC turns spotlight on micro-architecture solutions

Temporary architecture, reuse of materials, community building and simple buildings are the themes of the 2nd annual Sustainable Habitat Challenge micro-architecture workshop, to be held at the CPSA building at CPIT on 2 and 3 May.

Christchurch builders, designers, architects, engineers and community members will discuss ideas, deliver presentations and facilitate workshops at the event, which brings together some ideas for the city’s community-led regeneration.

Presenters including Mark Fielding, Juliet Arnott, Joshua Durrant, Jessica Halliday and Claire Benge will ask pertinent questions such as: What is permanent in our post-earthquake city? Using examples such as the cardboard cathedral and the convention centre – how long will Christchurch’s buildings serve us and how can international examples inspire us?

In San Francisco, for example, the Palace of Fine Arts was built in 1915 as a temporary building for the Panama-Pacific Exposition and still stands today as an icon of the city. As 2012 Pritzker architecture prizewinner Wang Shu has said, “People cherish their culture through recycling”.

The demolition of red stickered housing and CBD buildings does not mean the wholesale eradication of Christchurch’s history or culture, but how can we reuse and recycle materials to incorporate local memories and fuse the past with the present?

Entry by sliding scale koha, and is free for students and young people. To attend simply register at www.shac.org.nz or phone Tim Bishop on 021 705 346. CPD points available.

Poster: Micro-Architecture_poster2012

Draft Schedule SHAC-Micro-Architecture-Workshop-DRAFT-Schedule

Zero-Energy House

  

Zero-Modular House. This is a group work, members include David Wong, Jacky Lee, Praveen Karunasinghe and Biran He. We all had different tasks to utilize individual strengths in this group project. My responsibility was to research about solar panels, obstruction masks, and all presentation renders.

Since this is a tech paper, we had done a great amount of research on renewable resources, such as the minimum amount of solar panels needed to generate enough for the household.

>> Zero-Energy House.

GapFiller 10m2 SHAC

  

The Gap Filler temporary office
In December 2011, a team of young people got together with a vision to build an office for Gap Filler using materials saved from demolition sites around Christchurch. The team developed the design over the summer and with many talented volunteers built the office in a week in January!

The design and build was organised by SHAC in association with the Regeneration and White Elephant charitable trusts. Many skilled and unskilled volunteers helped out – builders, architects, engineers, young people and the occasional passer-by.

All of the building materials are reused, with the exception of building paper, insulation, chicken wire, fixings, clear plastic cladding and 4 sheets of thin treated plywood.

The office has an internal floor area of less than 10 square meters. Our talented designers and builders believe that the office complies with the building code, and is warm, stable, resistant to moisture, durable, and supports fire safety.

This office is experimenting with new building techniques. The east and southern wall structure are made from reused shipping pallets, a technology developed by Mark Fielding of Solabode Ltd in Nelson. The southern wall is clad with reused printing plates kindly donated by the Christchurch Press.

This tiny office will stay here for approximately 3 – 6 months. Power will come initially from neighbours and then, from solar power. Wireless internet access will come from a kind neighbour. Once we leave this site, the office will be relocated on a truck to another vacant site in Christchurch. The internal floor area is less than 10m2 and did not require a building consent.

We are using this land with the generous support of Ascot TV, who lost their building on this site in the earthquakes. They are now located at 300 Colombo Street, up the road.

What’s SHAC?
The Sustainable Habitat Challenge is a network of people designing and building more sustainable buildings and neighbourhoods. SHAC projects are educational in nature, teaching those involved new skills. The buildings they create are designed with non-profit group or charity in mind; in this case, Gap Filler. Gap Filler has been gifted this movable building which will be used as an office..

SHAC – affordable, delightful housing, micro architecture, simple building, and more… SHAC is about living well with less reliance on resources, and finding our purpose. See shac.org.nz for more info.

What’s Gap Filler?
Gap Filler is a creative urban regeneration initiative started in response to the September 4, 2010 Canterbury earthquake, and revised and expanded in light of the more destructive February 22, 2011 quake. It is now administered by the Gap Filler Charitable Trust. See gapfiller.org.nz for more info.

Gap Filler aims to temporarily activate vacant sites created by the quakes within Christchurch with creative projects for community benefit, to make for a more interesting, dynamic and vibrant city. Gap Filler has done a number of projects to date around Christchurch such as a book exchange, painted pianos, a community space and petanque pitch in Lyttelton, and outdoor events such as cinema and live music. Two projects have been completed in Sydenham recently, too – the outdoor chess set next to Honey Pot Café and Wayne Youle’s shadow board mural (working with Christchurch Art Gallery).

THANK YOU to: the landowners – ASCOT TV (especially Chris), Graham at ECO Framing, Barry Dowrick, CPIT and the Otago Polytechnic for the loan of many tools and Mark Fielding of Solabode Ltd in Nelson for the 5 prefab pallet walls and The Christchurch Press for the metal printing plates.

we thank you!

tim, clayton, barnaby, barry, lani, florian, ben, emma, ella, alice, amber, rachel, regan, felicity, alan, nick, seth, naomi, jules, the Australian group of young volunteers, ants, ann, nev, bob, dave, tarn, barry, darcy, Andrew, kyle, nastassja, Shayne, and kerry

Southern Demolition, Terra Lana Insulation, The Pumphouse [See Photo below], The Window Marketplace, Addington Demolition, Christchurch Demolition and Salvage, Clyne and Benny, Skelly Holdings, Dulux, Steel and Tube, White Elephant Trust and F3 Design, Solabode Ltd, Firth, and PSP

10m2 Challenge

  
Enter the SHAC 10m2 Challenge!
Design a 10m2 building that you would use as a music practice room, office, bedroom, house, shelter, or any other use.
Can incorporate awnings, eaves, decking, carports, conservatories, etc, as long as the entire structure does not require building consent.
Exact requirements for building work that does not require a consent can be found at the DBH:  http://www.dbh.govt.nz/bc-no-consent-schedule-1
Entering this challenge is an easy and fun way to become familiar with what building work requires a building consent.  Learn today and save yourself cost and difficulties in the future.
Designs due 20 August at 12:00 noon.
Exhibition and presentation of awards in Christchurch, at the Festival
 of Transitional
Architecture, Design and Building in Christchurch (Oct 19-27 2012)
Objectives
* Provide a playful competition to help designers, builders and the public better understand the art and science of building.
* Promote design and build as a collaborative, evolutionary process
* Promote the re-use of building materials
* Promote living well, with less reliance on resources
* For the cost of a year’s rent (say) – what can our designs inspire young people create?
Requirements
* The building must not require building consent, as per the DBH discussion document
* The building will provide for any such use as is envisaged by the design team: music practice room, office, bedroom, house, shelter.  It must be a building.
* The building has a use that the team argues contributes or promotes living well, with purpose, and with less reliance on resources.
* The building may make use of recycled building materials.
Submissions
* Submit your design, and an explanation about the building, how it is to be used, and how the building does not require a building consent.
* Explain the project and its purpose, it’s present and potential future uses.
* How it will be constructed
* What maintenance will be required
* How will it be supplied with any electrical power, if needed.
* A preliminary budget
* Please supply two A3 presentation sheets that explain the project. These sheets will be used for exhibition.  This may include 3D sketches, plans, elevations, sections, and/or photos of the materials or techniques to be used.
* Further details to aid in the construction will be helpful.  You may attach this additional information, eg budget, details, and further description as additional sheets. These additional sheets may be exhibited as space allows.
* You may choose to include a sketchup file.  Photos of projects underway are acceptable.
* Please submit the A3 sheets as PDFs.  Please submit all files electronically to [email protected]  Designs due 20 August at 12:00 noon. Maximum size about 15 MB per email.
* Submitted designs may be copyrighted by the author(s) under a Creative Commons license of your choice, suggested: “CC-Attribution” or “CC-Attribution-NonCommercial”
* The building must be legal to build and must not require building consent as per rules published by the DBH
* Questions can be sent to [email protected]
* SHAC reserves the right to not accept any entries.
* Best entries will be honoured with awards and prizes
* All entries will be published on our web site.
* Please have fun with this and give it a go!
Ideas
10m2 maximum internal floor area – walls can be as thick as you like.
Must be single storey, can have a steeply pitched roof and loft.
Timeline
Win Awards and Prizes!
$500 cash prize available to help you build your design.
Exhibition and presentation of awards in Christchurch, at the FESTA Design, Architecture and Building Festival in Christchurch (Oct 19-27 2012)
All entries will be presented to the public and potential clients who may help you realise your vision.  There is a student/young people category of the challenge.
[Optional] Register at www.shac.org.nz to received updates about the challenge and any clarification of rules

Inspiration
[note, not all of these buildings are less than 10m2 in size]
  1. Kevin Low’s Small Projects
  2. Chris and Ben’s SPACE MoveableRooms
  3. GapFiller’s Tati Design Competition and Temporary 10m2 Office
  4. DesignBoom’s Small Houses
  5. Dwelle
  6. F3 Design’s ArtBox
  7. The Marlborough Snug Sauna
  8. Bomun’s Awhi Farms projects
  9. Bruce Thomson and ModPreFab’s “Wood Cutters’ Paradise
  10. Chris Moller’s Click-Raft, and wikihouse.cc
  11. Daiman Otto’s Analog Structures

Thank you and have fun with this!
Tim Bishop
SHAC – The Sustainable Habita Challenge
0800 762 786
021 705 346
Skype: twbishop

Wood Cutters’ Paradise

  

For more information, contact [email protected]

Clean Energy Centre explores possibility of off-grid housing community

  

 

 

Taupo could be in for a new eco-sustainable housing community, reshaping the way houses receive heat, electricity, water, and use wastewater.

The New Zealand Clean Energy Centre (NZCEC) is currently investigating whether or not this would be feasible.

The community would use geothermal or biomass heat to heat homes; generate electricity from solar and wind sources; and reuse wastewater by drip-irrigating it to energy crops to provide future fuel for the community.

NZCEC said out of 75 people surveyed over the last two days, 33 had been in favour of the idea.

“The New Zealand public has demonstrated a keen interest in adapting their lifestyles to live in ways that are friendlier to the environment. They want to do their part to help maintain NZ’s 100% Pure, clean green image, they want to find ways of reducing their energy bills, and they want to increase their control over energy supply security,” says chief executive Rob McEwen.

He says the project would benefit  Taupo’s economy, enticing domestic and international migrants, especially Silicon Valley entrepreneurs looking to make New Zealand their home.

McEwen believes the pitch to these potential residents would go something like this:

“Taupo generates 75 times more clean energy than we consume (and thanks to geothermal, that ratio is growing). We have magnificent natural beauty (think of Taupo as the Tahoe of NZ), we have world class fibre optic internet, we have ample water, we are central to 75 percent of NZ’s population, we are home to the NZ Clean Energy Centre and oh, by the way … Taupo is developing a comprehensive off grid sustainable lifestyle community.”

 He says the next steps are to further quantify interest, then develop the concept to include drawings of the proposed community, a 3D animated walkthrough, and costings.

One way to make it feasible would be to use  semi-rural land on the outskirts of town so that homeowners’ investment in the land would be lower.

“Another way is to negotiate reduced development contributions with council. Unlike a typical subdivision where council needs to put in a lot of infrastructure such as water, waste water, power reticulation and phone connections, none of those services would be required in an off-grid community,” says McEwen.

>>> Clean Energy Centre explores possibility of off-grid housing community :: Idealog 

Office to rise from the rubble

  

One person’s rubble might be potential material for Gap Filler’s new office.

Sustainable Habitat Challenge (SHAC) and ReGeneration Trust New Zealand are collaborating to build an office for Gap Filler in Colombo St, Sydenham, with the help of volunteers and as many recycled or sustainable materials as possible.

Gap Filler project co-ordinator Coralie Winn said she was humbled by the plan.

“It’s a very generous gesture that they are doing this for us and also teaching young people building and design skills,” she said.

Gap Filler, which emerged after the September 2010 earthquake, has overseen several urban regeneration projects, such as the Lyttelton Petanque Club, the “book fridge” and the painted-piano project.

It has been based in Winn’s front room.

“Since November, we’ve hired a part-time helper, and people have been coming and going,” she said.

“It will be great to have an office that’s not at home. It would be quite nice to fill a gap with our own office.”

SHAC’s Tim Bishop said the frame of the 10-square-metre office would be built from recycled timber from demolished buildings, and the windows would also be recycled.

Waste polystyrene would be used for insulation, while the external walls would be constructed from wooden pallets usually used for transporting heavy goods.

“We want to show how to creatively reuse material left over from the earthquake. It’s a bit of a test. A few things are going to be new, like nails and building paper,” he said.

The project also aims to show young people that it can be easy and fun to build small buildings with sustainable materials.

Demolition and salvage yards, including Southern Demolition & Salvage, Musgroves and the Window Market Place, are also involved in the project.

The Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology is contributing equipment and helping to find a licensed builder.

The build will take a week, from January 23 to January 28.

Volunteers can sign up here.

 

via Office to rise from the rubble – the-press | Stuff.co.nz.

ReGenerating small, sustainable SHACs in the temporarily vacant sites of Christchurch

  

The ReGeneration Trust and SHAC (Sustainable Habitat Challenge) are keen to get rebuilding Christchurch. In January 2012, we’ll be running a six-day building project – starting from scratch, we’ll be working with builders, architects and a crew of young people to create a funky, recycled, moveable office for the Gap Filler project.

Gap Filler is a creative urban regeneration initiative that aims to temporarily activate vacant sites within Christchurch with creative projects, to make for a more interesting, dynamic and vibrant city. They’ve run a series of awesome projects, like the Lyttleton Petanque Club, Gap Filler Community Chess and the Think Differently Book Exchange.

We’ll be building an office for Gap Filler, using as many recycled and sustainable materials as we can. Our aim is to demonstrate that anyone can build and create, all it takes is some motivation and a few practical tools. We also want showcase the possibilities of holistic sustainability –
small, well insulated, water tight buildings made from a mixture of reused, recycled and sustainable materials.

ReGen and SHAC are now looking for motivated people who are willing to step up, represent and take practical action for positive change. The Christchurch 10m2 Building Project in an opportunity for creative, hands on types to work alongside experts on sustainable building, to learn new skills and share ideas for Christchurch in the future. We’ll be learning new skills each day and putting them into practice building walls, putting up roofs, cladding, internal lining, insulation and painting. And we’ll be documenting the process with stories, film and photographs.

If you’re a young person or a builder and you’re keen to be involved, get in touch! Email [email protected] or [email protected]

Happyzine » ReGenerating small, sustainable SHACs in the temporarily vacant sites of Christchurch.

Electric Bicycle – BMX

  

Tim Bishop, Electric BMX Bicycle

24″ wheels, nine continents motor, kelly controller, 48V, 350Watt-hour LiFePO4 battery pack

Range: 12km.  Top speed: 37km/hr

 

Parts List

www.evassemble.com
1 x Capacitor-16S-30A-BMS (Capacitor-16S-30A-BMS)  = $69.00
1 x KP-J(240W) Charger (KP-J(240W))  = $36.00
1 x Kelly KBS48121,50A,24-48V BLDC Motor Speed Controller
(KBS48121,50A,24-48V)  = $146.00

www.e-bikekit.com
nine continents motor via Ebike-kit distributor  US $152.00
EBK-SYS-REAR-DD-MOTOR

Emissions-free.com
Batteries Emissions-free.com 48x US$6  + shipping (let’s ignore shipping) = US$288 = NZ$390

ebikes.ca
Spokes $35 + 25 shp. $60 usd

Hobbyking.com and others
Fiberglass  NZ$20
Connectors (10 andersons connectors) 10x US$0.25 = NZ$3.50
Black adhesive foam tape  (Super cheap auto)  NZ$8.17
Brake cable and brake outer (Bike Otago) NZ$24.00
KMC Chain (Bike Otago) NZ$19.90
Super glue, LED and Heatshrink NZ$9.70
Charging socket (Jaycar)NZ$4.90
Charging Plug (Jaycar)  NZ$5.50
Handlebar On/off switch mount = NZ$12

Kevin McClouds grand design for British housing [The Observer]

  

“Anyone can build an eco-home,” he says, “but it doesn’t solve anything. There is nothing to stop them turning up the thermostat. What’s more interesting is the way people live and behave.” So the Triangle has allotments and polytunnels where people can grow their own food, and a car club and a scooter club that make their use of transport less wasteful. He sees such things as more important than the design features of individual houses.

via Kevin McClouds grand design for British housing [The Observer]

 

Micro Architecture Symposium 2011 Awards

  


SHAC Awards for 2011:

Speaker

Topic

Bruce Thompson

Experience building lightweight concrete infill construction for 15 years (egg cartons are not waste, they are a construction material) >>>

Liz Buxton

Designs from Sudan and Dunedin

Thomas Malpass

Simple buildings with trainee builders at Wintec in Hamilton

Andrew Just

A modular and very portable initiative designed to create a home for Christchurch artists, and a 15m2 accommodation unit built into a grain silo.  >>>

Michael Cambridge

Marlborough Housing Trust “Snug” – a high quality work space, bedroom or sauna using precut pine heartwood, and other European and North American examples. >>>

Chris and Ben

Developing and launching SPACE Moveable Rooms. Why we designed the way we did / transport constraints / commercial considerations / how the market is responding / new developments. >>>

Bomun Bock-Chung

Creating the best low cost, sustainable structures that are easy to build. >>>

Chris Moller

Developing a click-raft system and urban scale initiatives such as ‘city on a roof.  see click-raft.blogspot.com or click-raft.com  www.cityonaroof.net  www.hansafreehavens.net

Mark Fielding

Building homes using pallet frames, and other recycled waste materials in an effort towards marrying ecologically sustainability with affordability. >>>

Kevin Scally

UpDown Housing is a modular building system based on the design intelligence of early colonial buildings. They often started off as sheds and matured into houses. Inherent in their construction were features that made them easy to modify and recycle. UpDown Housing incorporated and extends this vernacular intelligence and design flexibility. This Cradle to Cradle system holds in trust the ecological investment in the building. The approach also anticipates the recycling, re-purposing and up-cycling of the modular components. Think Ikea and Mechano.  >>>

SHAC Symposium on Micro-Architecture, Simple Buildings, and Student Projects

  

Cost: $120 waged professionals / $40 students and others.
Date: Dunedin, 19-20th November, Registration on Saturday 9:00 – 16:00 / Sunday 9:00 – 15:00
Location: Ozone Lounge / Manaaki  / Otago Polytechnic / 51 Harbour Tce / Dunedin

Register Here >>>

How can today’s young people create their delightful and affordable homes and neighbourhoods?

This symposium brings together designers and builders who have figured out how to build a better way.

Let’s get to know each other.

Come for the weekend to the Otago Polytechnic to share your ideas and learn from local, national, and international innovative builders and designers.

SHAC Awards for 2011!

  • Commercialisation – Ben and Chris from SPACE MoveableRooms.co.nz
  • Practical Innovation – Michael Cambridge from Ecotect
  • Design – Andrew Just from CPIT and F3 Design
  • Pushing the Boundaries – Bomun Bock-Chung from Awhi Farms
  • Youth Participation and Supreme Awards – Thomas Malpass, Carpentry Tutor from Wintec

Speaker

Topic

Bruce Thompson

Experience building lightweight concrete infill construction for 15 years (egg cartons are not waste, they are a construction material) >>>

Liz Buxton

Designs from Sudan and Dunedin

Thomas Malpass

Simple buildings with trainee builders at Wintec in Hamilton

Andrew Just

A modular and very portable initiative designed to create a home for Christchurch artists, and a 15m2 accommodation unit built into a grain silo.  >>>

Michael Cambridge

Marlborough Housing Trust “Snug” – a high quality work space, bedroom or sauna using precut pine heartwood, and other European and North American examples. >>>

Chris and Ben

Developing and launching SPACE Moveable Rooms. Why we designed the way we did / transport constraints / commercial considerations / how the market is responding / new developments. >>>

Bomun Bock-Chung

Creating the best low cost, sustainable structures that are easy to build. >>>

Chris Moller

Developing a click-raft system and urban scale initiatives such as ‘city on a roof.  see click-raft.blogspot.com or click-raft.com  www.cityonaroof.net  www.hansafreehavens.net

Mark Fielding

Building homes using pallet frames, and other recycled waste materials in an effort towards marrying ecologically sustainability with affordability. >>>

Kevin Scally

UpDown Housing is a modular building system based on the design intelligence of early colonial buildings. They often started off as sheds and matured into houses. Inherent in their construction were features that made them easy to modify and recycle. UpDown Housing incorporated and extends this vernacular intelligence and design flexibility. This Cradle to Cradle system holds in trust the ecological investment in the building. The approach also anticipates the recycling, re-purposing and up-cycling of the modular components. Think Ikea and Mechano.  >>>

Incorporating the SHAC Awards for 2011!

Cost: $120 waged professionals / $40 students and others.

Date: Dunedin, 19-20th November

Location: Ozone Lounge / Manaaki  / Otago Polytechnic

51 Harbour Terrace / Dunedin (link to a map can be viewed here: http://goo.gl/UxaJG)
If you would like to share your work or ideas in the symposium, we are still receiving expression of interest so get back to us so we can organize a time for you to present. 8 minute and 20 minutes slots available.
Or if you would like to participate in the discussion you can register by following the link:

Register Here >>>

Country Conversion

  

When Matthew and Rebecca Taggat found a picturesque rural section in Raglan with a view to the Coast, it was love at first sight. The only problem was that they were not quite ready to build their “dream home”. The spot where they ultimately plan on building faces out to the nine acres of native bush that is part of their section, but for the interim, they decided a renovation was in order. A TotalSpan shed already on the site piqued their interest, and the renovation that ensued is testament to their creative vision from the beginning. At the time they embarked uponthe renovation, Rebecca was pregnant with
youngest daughter Ruby (now 10 months) and Milla was not yet one year old. Perhaps that was what spurred builder Daniel Klinkenberg of Urban Residential Developments Ltd into gear! From start to finish, Daniel took only three months to complete the transformation, and finished on the exact day he had specified in the contract. “We were
so impressed,” says Rebecca. “On the morning he finished, Daniel had cleaners in the house,and when he passed us the keys that afternoon, everything was perfect.”The revamped shed is still classified as an auxiliary building, to comply with local council regulations, and with that classification came some restrictions. The living area could be
no more than 70 square metres, plus three bedrooms and an office for Matthew. “There are some very clever design features,” says Rebecca. “For instance the roller door is still in place, kept high up and out of the way, but glass sliders in the same position really open the house up.” One thing that has changed drastically behind the scenes of the dwelling is the level of insulation. It had to be warm and healthy for the family of four, and the insulation instantly made the home more energy efficient. Rebecca and Matthew were pleased that Daniel put in “as much insulation as possible,” as well as double glazing
throughout. Another important part of the renovation was a new roof. The original was termed as a “shedding roof”, and the Taggarts wanted the safety of a residential grade alternative. To transform the shed into a home, extensive measures were taken, particularly across the front of the façade. “The whole face of the shed changed, but we stuck with iron on the other sides.” Cedar cladding softens the exterior, and Kwila decking helped to create an outdoor room. This is where the Taggart family spend most of their time in summer, in the sun and looking out toward the native bush.The interior is very light and
open, and belies the actual dimensionsof the home. A mainly white colour selection keeps each room spacious, as does the high pitch of the ceilings. Resene colour Alabaster is the shade throughout the house, with the ceilings in Resene Rice Cake. A soft Tasmanian Oak
floor also adds warmth, while keeping the feel light and airy.

MATERIALS

BEFORE & AFTER The former shed was once part of a large paddock in
which cows roamed, before it received
a comprehensive make-over to transform it into a family home.
FURNITURE Found on Trade Me, this feature chair adds a contemporary
feel with its modern patterned fabric.
KITCHEN HERB BOX In order to comply with local council regulations, a
recess had to be in place between the windowsill and the kitchen
bench. The result was a living herb garden, which fills the recess
perfectly.
FIRE With its radiant design the Metro H.T series wood burner is great
for heating open plan spaces. Finished
in metallic black high temperature paint, with a cooktop surface, this
fire is a great all rounder.

DIRECTORY

BUILDER
Urban Residential Developments Ltd
0275 397 005
www.urbanrd.co.nz
BATHROOMWARE
Michel Caesar www.michelcesar.co.nz
KITCHEN
Plain & Fancy Kitchens and Cabinets
07 847 4563
FIREPLACE
Metro Fires www.metrofires.co.nz
FLOOR BOARDS
Cedar Corp
0800 423 327
www.cedarcorp.co.nz
TILING
Brett Bateman Tiling
0800 4 47688

Homestyle, August/September, pg 52-56

 

Building work that does not require a building consent [DBH]

  

Detached buildings

Exemption (i) of Schedule 1

A building consent is not required for the following building work:

  • (i) building work in connection with any detached building (except a building that is required to be licensed in terms of the Hazardous Substances and New Organisms Act 1996 or a building closer than its own height to any residential accommodation or to any legal boundary) that-
  • (i) houses fixed plant or machinery, the only normal visits to which are intermittent visits for routine inspection and maintenance of that plant or machinery; or
  • (ii) into which, or into the immediate vicinity of which, people cannot or do not normally go; or
  • (iii) is used only by people engaged in the construction or maintenance of another building for which a building consent is required; or
  • (iv) does not exceed 1 storey, does not exceed 10 square metres in floor area, and does not contain sanitary facilities or facilities for the storage of potable water, but may contain sleeping accommodation (without cooking facilities) if the detached building is used in connection with a dwelling.

via Building work that does not require a building consent.

EKOKIT – Modular homes from Ebode & Hybrid Homes

  

 

 

 

 

EKOKIT is a range of self-build eco houses that have been specifically designed to be flexible, sustainable and within the price reach of ordinary New Zealanders.

EKOKIT homes can be built anywhere in New Zealand, under the supervision of a Licensed Building Practitioner. If you don’t wish to manage your EKOKIT build yourself your EKOKIT is also available as a complete finished home through Planet Homes.

via EKOKIT – from Ebode & Hybrid Homes.

F3 Design’s ArtBox

  

 

 

 

 

ArtBox aims to provide exhibition and retail space for approximately 100 Christchurch artists, craft practitioners and design retailers who have lost workspace and outlets, through the creation flexible and portable modules, all of which have been locally designed and manufactured.

The project, instigated by CPIT in conjunction with Christchurch firm F3 Design, will begin with 18 modules being placed in and around the CPIT campus, with the hope that with the community’s support it can branch out to support a River of Arts throughout the city.

Pippin Wright-Stow, who co-owns F3 Design with his sister Ella, said the idea was spearheaded by F3 Design employee Andrew Just, who also lectures at CPIT’s architecture school.

The ArtBox modules are a 2.9m cube that allow for the creation of comfortable and highly adaptable spaces. They can be stacked, oriented and arranged in various practical configurations, insulated with wool, and are weather-tight. And because the modules are based around a steel hollow section frame, Wright-Stow said they have are very strong and have the ability to resist loads placed by earthquakes.

They’re not designed for one-off use either. Their unique design allows for multi-functional and multi-purpose use across a number of industries, from artists and jewellers to craftspeople and education institutions, as well as festivals and events.

“The idea is that they can be on-sold and used as commercial or residential dwellings,” said Wright-Stow.

Featuring interchangeable wall and flooring panels, the boxes can be placed on any surface, including concrete and grass.

via Architects and engineers collaborate in solution for displaced artists and designers

CLICK-RAFT

  

INSPIRED BY HENRY DAVID THOREAU’S HUT AT WALDEN POND. TRANSLATED AS A TOOL FOR OUR TIME TUNED TO PLANET EARTH. A MINIMUM PROTOTYPE THAT ADJUSTS TO ITS ENVIRONMENT IN THE SENSE THAT A TREE DOES, IE AUTONOMOUS ENERGY, INFO, WATER+FOOD, INTEGRATED STRUCTURE, ENVIRONMENTAL SYSTEMS WITH LOUVRE SKINS THAT RESPOND VIA SENSORS TO TEMPERATURE, WIND, MOISTURE AND LIGHT. ‘..THIS FRAME SO SLIGHTLY CLAD, WAS A SORT OF CRYSTALLISATION AROUND ME..’ THOREAU.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

CLICK-RAFT.

Marlborough Snug

  

The Marlborough Snug is an innovative  design providing a high quality work space, bedroom or sauna using the unique properties of pine heartwood.

The Snug is a Marlborough Regional Development Trust affordable housing project.

It uses European research plus locally grown materials and local businesses.

Everyone who has seen it just loves it.

The first Snug is now in Christchurch at 166 Ferry Road where it is being used a tempory office.

Keep watching this site to find out how you can see it.

 

Marlborough Snug.

 

L41 – ultra-compact, sustainable, high-design, high quality, energy-efficient house

  

The L41 home, designed by Architect Michael Katz and  Artist Janet Corne is a 220 sq. ft. ultra-compact, sustainable, high-design, high quality, energy-efficient house. The L41 home makes it possible for the millions of people who otherwise could not afford to buy a house, to become homeowners.

Simply making a house small, however, is not good enough, it must be highly livable and delightful and the L41 is both.

In the same way that the Model-T made it possible for the masses to own a car, so too, the key to providing a house for everyone is to minimize its size and to utilize mass-production. The L41 has been specifically designed to be a mass-produced, “State-of-the-Art” house and could become part of the important group of affordable products such as the $2,500 Tata car


Sub-compact, highly affordable houses can satisfy the needs of many diverse groups:

•  First-time buyers   •   Students     •   Seniors   •    Hotels   •   Pied ‘d terres

•  Special-needs      •   Homeless    •   Military   •   Emergency housing


The L41 home is designed for a generation that understands the principles of “small is beautiful”, preservation of resources, improving the lives of others and enhancing our f uture by means of sustainable actions. With every inch of space utilized and many built-in storage solutions provided, L41 fulfills the maxim, “everything in its place and a place for everything”.


 

 

 

 

L41 is constructed of Cross-laminated Timber, (CLT) a relatively new wood product in North America. The true benefit of CLT is that it is solid wood and can be used as a substitute for concrete in mid-rise buildings. (the British have built 9 stories) When one considers that concrete is responsible for 8% of the world’s carbon emissions, the implications become clear.


L41 homes can be built in many configurations, from a single unit to high-rise buildings and because of the high achievable densities, can play a significant role in providing affordable housing in inner-city locations. In addition to the 220 sq. ft. Studio, there also is a 290 sq. ft. 1-Bed and a 360 sq. ft. 2-Bedroom unit.

Read more… L41.

Rural Southern Studio: Small Space, Small Budget

  

 

Baltimorean Will Homan, along with Pernilla Hagberth from Sweden and Clementine Blakemore from England, took on the Auburn University Rural Studio challenge: plan, design, and build a $20K house in Hale County, Alabama that could potentially be produced as a viable alternative to trailers in the area and purchased with a 502 Direct Loan. Above you see the project, from beginning sketches to one finished house. After the inaugural project in 2005, this structure marks the program’s ninth iteration. Now for the details…

 

 

 

Read more at Rural Southern Studio: Small Space, Small Budget.

Lightweight Wall Construction

  

A wall made from cinderblocks made from a mix of concrete, paper and egg cartons.

For more information, contact Bruce Thomson at [email protected] or 07 5767614